poultry in motion

poultry in motion :: the other, other white meat

Anonymous asked: I saw your profile on AWDG. (Possible Design/Dev lead) Is there an email address I can contact you at? Justin HooperSales ManagerCustomPathIDX, LLC. 770-891-7886 mobile404-537-9729 office678-805-4738 fax

schwamommy@gmail.com

Water(noun) chik-uhn milk"As a child I only wanted milk, so my dad gave me water but called it chicken milk."  - Ivan C., Marlboro, New York
Pimmed (verb) to post something on the bwakbwak blog aka PIM aka POULTRY IN MOTION. "I just pimmed chicken milk."- alicia johnson, atlanta, georgia

Water
(noun) chik-uhn milk

"As a child I only wanted milk, so my dad gave me water but called it chicken milk." 
 - Ivan C., Marlboro, New York

Pimmed 
(verb) to post something on the bwakbwak blog aka PIM aka POULTRY IN MOTION.
"I just pimmed chicken milk."
- alicia johnson, atlanta, georgia

I, for one, welcome our new chicken overlords. #005

I, for one, welcome our new chicken overlords. #005

"Your pet is re-fillable”

"Your pet is re-fillable”

Do it, doers. GLAD IT UP.

Do it, doers. GLAD IT UP.

Chickens in Literature: THE JOKE ABOUT CHICKENS by Wyatt Williams

1. thoroughly enjoyed this article last week. never got around to posting it up on PIM and all hail the reblog.

2. there is a TUMBLR called CHICKEN IN LIT!

3. that elementary school chix illo is pretty nice.

chickensinliterature:

The Paris Review Daily has this story, see, and chickens are involved. And I lead you to it with this link as it is probably not okay to appropriate it in its entirety at this time. image

"As part of our plan to become adults, we decided to get chickens."

Wyatt Williams, that was a…

Stuff your chicken with your stuff. Duh. #rubberchickenpurse [via boing boing]

Stuff your chicken with your stuff. Duh. #rubberchickenpurse [via boing boing]


The idea sprouted in my head to make a magazine not because there aren’t enough curated, pretty pictures of food in the world. There’s already plenty of that. The idea of a dinner table is that it brings together people and conversation and stories and drinks and food, too. This magazine might be something like that — a place where people meet over a good meal.
In this issue, there will be pictures taken at Grassroots Farm, a small place near Reidsville, Ga. where Brandon Chonko lives with his wife and kids and raises poulet rouge chickens. Later you’ll see some pictures taken at my house, where I smoked a couple of those chickens and sat down with the other people who helped make this magazine.
Brandon got his start as a farmer by walking into a restaurant unannounced with a bag of quail in his hand. One thing led to another and now he makes his living and supports a family raising poultry. His chickens are served in some of the best restaurants in Georgia. Brandon personally manages each step of the process with his own hands.
I wanted to tell Brandon’s story not because his operation is the biggest or most polished or most innovative in Georgia. Brandon does things in an honest and right way, and that’s the kind of story we hope to tell with Brother. Along the way, we’ll introduce you to some people who make good, honest food. And we’ll show you pictures that tell the whole story, without flinching at the moments some magazines would rather ignore.
— Ryan Smith

The idea sprouted in my head to make a magazine not because there aren’t enough curated, pretty pictures of food in the world. There’s already plenty of that. The idea of a dinner table is that it brings together people and conversation and stories and drinks and food, too. This magazine might be something like that — a place where people meet over a good meal.

In this issue, there will be pictures taken at Grassroots Farm, a small place near Reidsville, Ga. where Brandon Chonko lives with his wife and kids and raises poulet rouge chickens. Later you’ll see some pictures taken at my house, where I smoked a couple of those chickens and sat down with the other people who helped make this magazine.

Brandon got his start as a farmer by walking into a restaurant unannounced with a bag of quail in his hand. One thing led to another and now he makes his living and supports a family raising poultry. His chickens are served in some of the best restaurants in Georgia. Brandon personally manages each step of the process with his own hands.

I wanted to tell Brandon’s story not because his operation is the biggest or most polished or most innovative in Georgia. Brandon does things in an honest and right way, and that’s the kind of story we hope to tell with Brother. Along the way, we’ll introduce you to some people who make good, honest food. And we’ll show you pictures that tell the whole story, without flinching at the moments some magazines would rather ignore.

— Ryan Smith

(Source: brotherjournal, via travisekmark)

Jiminy chicken, he flew the coop!

Jiminy chicken, he flew the coop!

vote for my DEAR DEER EGG here

vote for my DEAR DEER EGG here